Additional Blogs of Interest

Living Wills and Medical Powers of Attorney

Posted by Whitcomb, Selinsky, PC Staff on Jul 14, 2019 9:04:56 PM

Planning for incapacity is easy to put off, but important to address. If you lose the ability to decide medical care issues on your own because of illness, accident or age, having the appropriate legal documents in place allows someone you trust to make those decisions on your behalf. If you don’t make medical care arrangements in advance, then estranged family members, doctors, or judges may have to make the decisions for you.

Read More

Tags: Estate Planning, Wills, Trusts & Estates

Property Ownership and Deeds in Estate Planning

Posted by Michael Milazzo on Jul 7, 2019 8:50:25 AM

Real estate is frequently the most valuable part of an estate. It is important to know how your property is titled when estate planning to determine how to ensure that the property transfers to your desired beneficiaries. Property is titled in many different ways reflecting various types of ownership. Consequently, property can be titled in such a way as to avoid probate.

Read More

Tags: Estate Planning, Wills, Trusts & Estates

Providing for Pets in Your Estate Planning

Posted by Michael Milazzo on Jul 1, 2019 7:23:23 PM

Estate planning is for all members of the family – even the furry ones. Don’t forget your pets in estate planning. One way to take care of pets in estate planning is through a pet trust. Although often an overlooked part of an estate plan, ensuring that your pet will be taken care of after you die is important. Sixty-eight percent of American households have pets. Under the law, however, a pet is considered property. So in a worst case scenario, the lack of a pet trust could lead to the unintended placement of your beloved pet into a shelter. You can create a testamentary trust that is enacted upon death as long as you designate funds to go into the trust. You could also create a trust if you become incapacitated and are unable to care for your pet.

Read More

Tags: Estate Planning, Wills, Trusts & Estates

Content not found